Silver Snoopy Award Winners

Recently three ERC employees Robin Osborne (ESSSA), Mary Fry (TOSC), and Mark Smith (TOSC) were each awarded a Silver Snoopy.  Congratulation to each of you from your ERC Family!  Please see below for a short write up highlighting the work each of these individuals has done to receive this prestigious award.

Robin and her family

Robin and her family

Robin Osborne, a propulsion engineer for MSFC who designs engine components for next generation space launch systems, has been instrumental in developing testing of engine systems, and design modifications of engine components resulting in major cost savings.  Her input and contributions to the J-2X engine test program have also resulted in more efficient and safer engine component designs.  More specifically, her recommendations for the testing of the Augmented Spark Igniter (ASI) component and integrated subsystem testing of the J-2X Engine Program directly resulted in reduced cost by proposing the use of heritage J-2X hardware that produced a baseline for system operations.  The cost of the initial test program was further reduced by $1 million when she identified a source for a liquid hydrogen Dewar which allowed the program to be moved from Test Stand 115 to Test Cell 103.

In addition to major cost-savings to the engine program, Robin has been instrumental in making design recommendations resulting in safer integrated engine subsystems.  In an investigation of an erosion issue in connection with the engine that would have resulted in a potential catastrophic hazard and increased cost, and because Robin conducted a thorough ASI test program, the prime contractor immediately moved to a much smaller oxidizer orifice for the ASI on the engine system.  Her input was essential to the engine contractor to perform the necessary modifications for an increase in safety, efficiency, and performance of this engine component.

(Left to Right) Mary Fry, Astronaut Kevin Ford, Joan Waas (mother) and Marianne Rigolini

(Left to Right) Mary Fry, Astronaut Kevin Ford, Joan Waas (mother) and Marianne Rigolini

Mary Fry was awarded for her significant contributions beyond normal work requirements and for an outstanding effort to implement the Financial Express (Finex) application.  Since the beginning of TOSC implementation in March 2013, Mary has continually exceeded expectations supporting a variety of customers, including Logistics, Procurement and, most recently, Finance.

As a System Analyst, Mary’s primary responsibility is to work with customers and turn their business needs into working systems. She needs to understand both the functioning business processes as well as the capabilities of the development tool sets and align them together to build a working system.

She served a crucial role during the TOSC transition and the latest upgrade of the PeopleSoft environment. Her expertise and experience ensured the successful transfer of millions of dollars of inventory from legacy contracts to TOSC.  Mary has an incredible talent for working with a wide variety of customers and performing at a high level of excellence in every task she is assigned.

(Left to Right): Todd Lamond, Jane Reutt, Mark Smith, Terry Berman, and Gary Casteel.

(Left to Right): Todd Lamond, Jane Reutt, Mark Smith, Terry Berman, and Gary Casteel.

Mark Smith was awarded for his commitment to safety in the workplace, working beyond his normal work requirements, and contributing a major cost avoidance while increasing the safety, quality and efficiency to a major Space Launch System (SLS) milestone.

A Crawlers/Structures Electrical Engineer, Mark was instrumental to the safe and successful disassembly of the Crawler #2 gear boxes. Approximately 1,000 labor hours were used to remove the steering arm due to multiple bolt studs, which became bonded to the truck chassis due to 60 years of exposure to the elements. During the removal process, a great deal of manual labor was expended, which led to a minor incident involving a technician being struck by a sledge hammerhead that failed during use. As a result, Mark researched various stud removal tools and finally settled on the Thunderbolt 250 recoilless hammer. Mark conducted a site demonstration with the vendor (RME) and NASA, which revealed Thunderbolt 250’s true potential by removing 14 studs in two hours (previous manual methodology took three weeks). The resulting procurement will support the subsequent removal of the seven remaining steering arms.

Using previous manual methodology to remove the studs would yield approximately 2,240 labor hours or $123,000. The Thunderbolt 250 is expected to cost $35,000, resulting in a projected savings of $88,000 (cost avoidance) while also mitigating the safety hazards associated with the manual sledge hammer method.

Mark has also demonstrated similar actions to mitigate potential safety concerns, including researching alternate materials to be used for a potential slip/fall hazard on the crawler. He also volunteered to be the Point of Contact to train and certify TOSC personnel as a “Qualified Electrical Technician” and helped author the Qualified Electrical Technician operating procedure.

 

*Credit to TOSC Times Staff for write up and pictures